How much does the vaccination cost and who pays for it?

How much does the vaccination cost and who pays for it?

Answer

The recommended COVID-19 vaccination is free of charge for people living in Switzerland. The costs are covered by compulsory health insurance, the federal government and the cantons.

The vaccination is also available free of charge to cross-border commuters and to Swiss citizens living abroad, as well as their immediate family members living in the same household. For those without compulsory health insurance in Switzerland, the costs are covered by the federal government.

You’ll find detailed information on the coverage of the costs of vaccination on the Vaccination page.

Over what period following vaccination can adverse vaccination reactions occur?

Over what period following vaccination can adverse vaccination reactions occur?

Answer

Most side effects occur shortly after vaccination. As a rule, they are mild and last only a short time. Similar to the side effects of other vaccinations, these are mostly reactions at the injection site (pain in particular, but also redness and swelling) or general symptoms (such as fatigue, headache, aching muscles and joints or fever). Side effects are possible for six months after vaccination.

Contact your doctor if the side effects last for a longer period or get worse, or if there is a change in your wellbeing in the weeks after the vaccination.

Can having the vaccination trigger a positive test result?

Can having the vaccination trigger a positive test result?

Answer

No. The vaccination cannot result in a positive PCR or rapid antigen test result.

This is because the mRNA or DNA that enters the body through vaccination with the mRNA or vector vaccine and the protein subsequently produced are not detected by PCR or rapid antigen tests. This also applies to the protein components of vaccines. The tests detect other components of the virus.

If you are tested positive after the vaccination it means you became infected with the coronavirus before you had built immune protection – or that you have caught the virus despite the vaccination. This is because no vaccination guarantees 100% protection. In rare cases a test may also yield a false positive.

What side effects can occur after the vaccination?

What side effects can occur after the vaccination?

Answer

The vaccines administered in Switzerland are safe and effective. As is the case with all medications, vaccines can cause side effects. They are usually mild and of short duration.

Common side effects include:

  • Reaction at the injection site such as pain, redness and swelling
  • Headache, fatigue
  • Muscle and joint pain
  • General symptoms such as shivering, feeling feverish or temperature

Cases of nettle rash have been reported after a booster vaccination, and a possible link is currently being investigated.

In very rare cases, severe side effects may occur, such as an allergic reaction. Such a reaction usually occurs immediately after the vaccination and is easy to treat. In individuals with a history of severe allergic reactions, appropriate precautionary measures must be observed in the event of a vaccination.

In very rare cases, inflammation of the heart muscle or the pericardium has been observed shortly after vaccination with an mRNA vaccine (usually within 14 days). The majority of these cases were mild and could be treated effectively. Typical symptoms of heart muscle inflammation are chest pain, shortness of breath, fatigue and palpitations. Consult your doctor immediately if you experience such symptoms. Inflammation of the heart muscle or pericardium also occurs after infection with the coronavirus.

In isolated cases, rare types of blood clot (particularly in veins in the brain and abdomen, and in the arteries) have been observed within the first three weeks of vaccination with the Janssen viral vector vaccine. These incidents were severe, but only occurred in very rare cases (in between one and eight in 1 million people) after vaccination with the Janssen viral vector vaccine.

Apart from this, no serious side effects have been reported in the studies conducted or by the persons who have been vaccinated since. Any possible side effects are being monitored by specialists on an ongoing basis.

Severe side effects must be reported to the authorities. The Swissmedic reporting office assesses any reports and, if concerning patterns emerge (e.g. an increase in specific reports), initiates an investigation into a possible correlation with the vaccine.

Further information on reports of suspected adverse reactions to the authorised vaccines can be found on the Swissmedic website.

Can an mRNA vaccine change my genetic material (DNA/genes)?

Can an mRNA vaccine change my genetic material (DNA/genes)?

Answer

No. The mRNA administered with the vaccination is unable to reach the nucleus and incorporate itself in the human genome (DNA/genes). Furthermore, both the mRNA from the vaccine and the proteins produced in the cells are quickly broken down by the body once more. This is because by this time the body has already launched the required immune response and the mRNA and the proteins are no longer needed to protect the body against the coronavirus.

The mRNA administered with the vaccine is not dangerous for the body. The human body produces mRNA naturally and requires it in order to make vital proteins. Incidentally, in case of an infection with the coronavirus, virus RNA also enters our bodies.

Even though the mRNA vaccine is based on a new technology, research into mRNA vaccines has already been going on around the world for around ten years. This means that a number of studies and results are already available.

All results on the efficacy and safety of the vaccines can be found on the Infovac website (available in German, French and Italian).

Find out more about the mRNA vaccine in the question: What is mRNA  and how does an mRNA vaccine work?

Should I have the vaccination if I’m ill?

Should I have the vaccination if I’m ill?

Answer

It’s better to postpone the vaccination if you have a high temperature and feel ill or unwell. But you should make sure you get the vaccination once you have no more symptoms.